Rev.Reverence

HAPPY SAINT PATRICKS DAY!

30 posts in this topic

damn...that is today...well, looks like all the drunk idiots are going to keep me up all night...this day actually makes me glad to be scottish...

but to those that will not be keeping me up with their drunken asshattery...have fun and be safe, I see way to many accidents from drunks during a NORMAL day...

and if this happens...

drunk.jpg

take a picture and put it on the internet...I helps with future jobs...

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I don't have anything green, but I do get drunk...does that count? And what's with the orange? Someone told me a long time ago that if you wore green that meant you were Catholic, and if you wore orange that meant you were Protestant, but I never actually confirmed that rumor. If that's the case, then I guess I get orange not green.

I dunno if I can get drunk today, I mean usually I use the 17th of March as an excuse to have a beer or seven with breakfast, but I'm supposed to go to the gym later. I guess there's nothing more in-spirit than drunk weight-lifting, yes?

Edited by Chernobyl

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I don't have anything green, but I do get drunk...does that count? And what's with the orange? Someone told me a long time ago that if you wore green that meant you were Catholic, and if you wore orange that meant you were Protestant, but I never actually confirmed that rumor. If that's the case, then I guess I get orange not green.

I dunno if I can get drunk today, I mean usually I use the 17th of March as an excuse to have a beer or seven with breakfast, but I'm supposed to go to the gym later. I guess there's nothing more in-spirit than drunk weight-lifting, yes?

What do atheists wear?

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An Irish joke, passed on to me by a friend-- perfect for the occasion:

John O'Reilly hoisted his beer and said, 'Here's to spendin' the rest of me life, between the legs of me darlin' wife!'

That won him the top prize at the pub for the best toast of the night!

He went home and told his wife, Mary, 'I won the prize for the Best toast of the night'

She said, "Aye, did ye now. And what was your toast?"

John said, "Here's to spending the rest of me life, sitting in church beside me wife."

"Oh, tha' tis very nice indeed, John!" Mary said.

The next day, Mary ran into one of John's drinking buddies on the street corner.

The man chuckled leeringly and said, "John won the prize the other night at the pub with a toast about you, Mary."

She said, "Aye, he told me, and I was a bit surprised myself. You know, he's only been there twice in the last four years. Once he fell asleep, and the other time I had to pull him by the ears to make him come."

:rofl: :rofl:

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An Irish joke, passed on to me by a friend-- perfect for the occasion:

John O'Reilly hoisted his beer and said, 'Here's to spendin' the rest of me life, between the legs of me darlin' wife!'

That won him the top prize at the pub for the best toast of the night!

He went home and told his wife, Mary, 'I won the prize for the Best toast of the night'

She said, "Aye, did ye now. And what was your toast?"

John said, "Here's to spending the rest of me life, sitting in church beside me wife."

"Oh, tha' tis very nice indeed, John!" Mary said.

The next day, Mary ran into one of John's drinking buddies on the street corner.

The man chuckled leeringly and said, "John won the prize the other night at the pub with a toast about you, Mary."

She said, "Aye, he told me, and I was a bit surprised myself. You know, he's only been there twice in the last four years. Once he fell asleep, and the other time I had to pull him by the ears to make him come."

:rofl: :rofl:

Great joke!

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3126913f.jpg

The History of the Holiday

St. Patrick's Day is celebrated on March 17, his religious feast day and the anniversary of his death in the fifth century. The Irish have observed this day as a religious holiday for over a thousand years.

On St. Patrick's Day, which falls during the Christian season of Lent, Irish families would traditionally attend church in the morning and celebrate in the afternoon. Lenten prohibitions against the consumption of meat were waived and people would dance, drink, and feast—on the traditional meal of Irish bacon and cabbage.

:harhar:

Told ya' so!

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Corned Beef

corned beef and cabbage

Each year, thousands of Irish Americans gather with their loved ones on St. Patrick's Day to share a "traditional" meal of corned beef and cabbage.

Though cabbage has long been an Irish food, corned beef only began to be associated with St. Patrick's Day at the turn of the century.

Irish immigrants living on New York City's Lower East Side substituted corned beef for their traditional dish of Irish bacon to save money. They learned about the cheaper alternative from their Jewish neighbors.

CORNED BEEF....an American penny pinching tradition!

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I don't have anything green, but I do get drunk...does that count? And what's with the orange? Someone told me a long time ago that if you wore green that meant you were Catholic, and if you wore orange that meant you were Protestant, but I never actually confirmed that rumor. If that's the case, then I guess I get orange not green.

I dunno if I can get drunk today, I mean usually I use the 17th of March as an excuse to have a beer or seven with breakfast, but I'm supposed to go to the gym later. I guess there's nothing more in-spirit than drunk weight-lifting, yes?

I heard that one as well...but it was heresay..& I am looking for a note about it SOMEWHERE...but can not find one.

...Saint Patrick's colour was blue...a certain hue of blue...

333px-Flag_President_of_Ireland.svg.png

I did find this...it's pretty cool.

To mark St Patrick's Day, Faith Central has compiled 10 celebratory tidbits, some myth, some fact, on the Patron Saint of the Irish.

1. The potato crop was traditionally planted in Ireland after March 17

2. Blue not green is the color originally associated with St Patrick. “St Patrick’s Blue” is used on Ireland's Presidential Standard or flag, while the Irish Guards sport a plume of St Patrick’s blue in their bearskins. The emphasis on green is thought to be linked to “wearing the Green”, a symbol from the 18th century on, of sympathy with Irish independence.

3. St Patrick is patron of fishermen in the Loire, where a legend associates him with a blackthorn bush. The saint is said to have slept beneath it, and when he awoke the next day, Christmas, the bush flowered, and was said to have continued to do so every Christmas until its destruction during the First World War.

4. A regiment of the Mexican army in the 1846 -8 War between Mexico and America was named after St Patrick. Members of the Batellón de San Patricio included Afro-Americans freshly liberated from the slave plantations of the South, and the soldiers were granted Mexican citizenship afterwards.

5. The first St Patrick’s Day parade took place in 1737 in Boston, followed in 1762 by New York. George Washington allowed his soldiers a holiday on March 17, 1780 as “an act of solidarity with the Irish in their fight for independence.”

6. Until the 1970’s, all pubs were shut in Ireland on St Patrick’s Day, and the sole venue selling drink the annual dog show. Lenten fasting – and the obligation to abstain from meat – were lifted on the day, which most families would begin with Mass.

7. St Patrick’s Day is a public holiday in Ireland and also in Monserrat "the Emerald Isle of the Carribean,” so called because it was settled in 1633 by Irish migrants from St Kitts.

8. According to legend, on the day of Judgement, while Christ judges all other nations, St Patrick will be the judge of the Irish.

9. Since 1962, tons of green dye are tipped on St Patrick’s Day into the Chicago river, although the quantity has reduced, for environmental reasons, from 100 to 40.

10. Should you wish to carry on celebrating St Patrick after March 17, in the United States, you might visit the four Shamrocks in the USA including Mount Gay-Shamrock, W.Va or the nine cities named Dublin, including Dublin, Ohio (the largest Dublin in the U.S.) and Dublin, Georgia.

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